Garden Blogs: Photos And Advertising

– Posted in: Miscellaneous

After reading a recent post on Garden Rant about advertising on blogs,  my fellow blogger, Nan, and I spent time chatting on the phone about what readers want in a garden blog, and what kind of content they expect. From my point of view, a blogger has a right to do or write whatever she or he wants, just as we as readers have the right to stay and read or click elsewhere and move on. When you’re watching TV, if you’re not interested in a show’s content, you change the channel. When you buy a gardening magazine and find it has too many ads, you cancel your subscription or don’t buy it again. If you don’t like the content, design, or ad content of a particular blog, then don’t go back. It’s that simple.

Another garden-blog issue that Nan and I discussed is the type of photos that bloggers post. We both have noticed a few complaints about only close-up photos in gardens being posted. Some people feel that the desire of bloggers to show only the best of what they have in their garden is an injustice to their readers—that it is important to show a garden or garden area in its totality so that the reader can learn from what really exists.

So, you folks out there (and you too, my fellow bloggers at KapliPRO), what kind of photos do you really want to see on garden blogs? And to those of you who have your own garden blogs, how do you choose the photos you use on your own site?

As an aside, if you have a chance, check out the November issue of The English Garden magazine, which has done a story on the garden of Clive Nichols, a renowned English garden photographer, with both close-ups and photos with perspective (from a distance) that he has taken. By the way, his website is: www.clivenichols.com.

Personally, I’m a sucker for both types of photos. For me, it’s like going to view some of my favorite paintings at an art museum, whether it be Cezanne, Picasso or Van Gogh. In order to appreciate the full breadth of a piece of art, I stand a distance from it, perhaps 10-12 feet, taking my time to gaze at it and then position myself near the painting so that I can observe the detail of the it. Perspective can add a depth to one’s understanding and  make the painting more compelling for the viewer. The same holds true with garden photography.

So now, chime in and let us know your thoughts!

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Fran Sorin

Fran Sorin

Fran is the author of the highly-acclaimed book, Digging Deep: Unearthing Your Creative Roots Through Gardening, which Andrew Weil, M.D., recommends as "a profound and inspiring book."  

A graduate of the University of Chicago with Honors in Psychology, she is also a gardening and creativity expert, coach, inspirational speaker, CBS radio news gardening correspondent, and Huffington Post Contributor.

Learn more about Fran and get free resources that will help you improve your life at www.fransorin.com.

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Fran Sorin
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